Windstorm

The day after the greenhouse move, with the baseboard incompletely secured, I went pressing apples for the day, feeling pleasantly assured that the worst was all done, and that I could get to the finishing touches the next day.

At night I got a phone call: “Have you heard that we’re supposed to get 90km/h winds tomorrow?  I was thinking of you and your greenhouse….”  Closely followed by, “Should I come and help you?” because this friend is that thoughtful and kind.

The winds rose in the night, and by first light, the endwalls were already pushed off the base, framing pulled apart, the bottom edges of all the plastic were free, and losing the greenhouse completely seemed rather imminent.

In the next two hours, the winds rose further, the rain started sheeting down, one of the corners tore completely loose, our friend showed up at the perfect time, and we gained the structure back, securing it bit by bit to get through the storm.

I don’t think we ever did get 90kmh gusts, although parts of NS got up to 130.  In the moment it was a panic action, doing what most needs to be done.  We were soaked and struggling with everything wet and muddy and fighting against us.  In retrospect, if the wind had continued to go up instead of pausing and then abating, as it did, or if help had not come, the whole thing could very easily have tugged itself free and gone for a sail.

In the midst of it all, chicks!

The telltale shell!  She’s got a chick in there:)

And outside, I discovered the squad of guineas huddled around the base of the walnut tree.  Among them, three tiny chicks!

I discovered the hen setting, with a couple hatchlings, a few days ago (Yay, I thought she was dead!).  They stay on the nest a couple days before the mom and chicks rejoin the flock.  But what a day to join the flock!

I kidnapped her chicks.  She was soaked and looked miserable, and didn’t have much fight in her when I snatched them up.Then I brought them inside and used them to bait their mother into the greenhouse.  It took a little bit.  The chicks were just fine with being held – cozy! so I had to massage them to make them cheep, and then mom would bristle up, try to locate them, and charge.

Once she was in, she was like hmm, ok, it’s dry in here.  Perhaps I’ll stay. There’s food.

The little brown chicks are so small and brown they are hard to see in the mud.

Family portrait!  All the Silkie chicks and the Chanticleer chicks, and a hen, all in the dismal mud hole of the greenhouse.  With the multipurpose clothes rack.All of them are checking out the newcomer.  Who’s that!? Happily, all the rest of the guineas came into the greenhouse voluntarily at night, because mom was in there.   Well, sort of.They’re on the boards nailed up to keep the doors on. I had to tap a couple on the tail to make them jump down.  I need to close the door now guys. 

2 thoughts on “Windstorm”

Leave a Reply