Category Archives: Family + Friends + Animals

Nosey is auditioning for role of house chicken.

Nosey the Nosy thinks that I have a chicken-shaped void in my life, and she’s the chicken to fill it.
I see that you don’t have a house chicken at the moment.  I’d like to leave my resumé.

It’s true, it’s been a long time since Cheeks moved out.  Nosey has an unusual degree of interest in the house.  With the door always open and the screen on, she spends a lot of time standing on the threshold looking in.And riffling the screen with her beak.I know this opens somehow! 

She work from one side to the other, worrying it.  She hasn’t figured it out yet though.

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Until the day a screen magnet snapped to the door, holding the screen open. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oh, Hello.

She strolled around the mud room for some time, inspecting, looking around. The “up” things were really interesting.   As were the knots in the wood.

I let her be.

I was walking back and forth to the door, and she’d look at me and walk towards the door (I was just leaving!), then watch me, and seeing I wasn’t actually shooing her out, turn around and resume inspection (Well in that case I don’t mind if I stay).  Who says chickens aren’t smart.

Inspecting the boot tray.

She stayed in the mud room, just peeking into the house.

Baby Nosey.

 

Profile: Nosey

All chickens have their own unique chickenalities, but some chickens distinguish themselves more than others.  Nosey has been her own bird from a young chicken, and unlike everyone else, is rather tame.  She got her name from always being excessively interested in my business, and always really into being near me.  She’d be the first at the door, have her beak up in whatever I was doing, sit on my shoulder, and generally tag along or be underfoot.She’s all grown up now, and her first adult summer has seen her create some real habits of behaviour.  She’s still excessively interested in my movements, popping out of nowhere anytime I come out the door, following me down paths, literally underfoot all the time, as I frequently trip on her or accidentally kick her while walking, as she darts in front of or between my swinging feet.When I prepare their food, stirring water into the bucket, all the hens gather and stretch their necks over the edge, but Nosey runs laps around the bucket, then stands on top of my feet to stretch over the edge of the bucket.  Then she follows me to platter after platter as I fill the “trough”s, and dives into each one, then darts to catch up with me at the next serving, as she has to be the first beak in.  Sometimes she’ll follow me all the way back to where I put the bucket away at the end of lunchtimeShe walks with me like a dog heeling, right next to me on the trail, and her pace is a little faster, so she’ll get ahead of me, then pause for me to catch up, then walk right next to me, get excited and get ahead, then pause again.  I’ve never had a chicken do something like this before.  It’s very pet-like, very trying to please, or connect.

She’s very interested in the house, hopping up and watching me through the screen when the door is open.  She just seems more connected to me than she is to the other chickens, although she’s part of the main “hangs out around the house during the day” chickens. 

She’s the only one that allows me to touch her, and I do almost every day, stroking her chest.  She gets all uncomfortable about it and it’s clear she doesn’t like it, but she lets me.  The other hens will leap and squawk when I try a stunt like that.

When other people say pretty much anything starting with “There’s this one chicken”, I know they mean Nosey.
“This one chicken is out here looking in my boot!”  Nosey.
“There was one chicken that came right up to me”.   Nosey.

I heard this one go down:  My husband was outside, and from inside I heard his yelp, and then indignant complaining out loud.  His tale of woe – he was standing outside, eating an apple, pensively watching the chickens, and as he stood between bites, with his arm relaxed at his side, “this one chicken” leapt up and knocked the half eaten apple out of his hand.

Of course, Nosey had the apple.

Cheeps at the door

I hear them coming around, the cheeps.  They never stop chatting at this age.

I’m glad that the moms are starting to gravitate to the house and beehives –  the safe zones instead of the adventure safaris.  This is where you’ll spend your time when you grow up, kids.  Mooching.

The two of them are too adorable to me.  Inseparable, yin and yang chickens, not very alike other than that they (were) both loners.    The chicks float in one crowd with loose ties to their own mama except for bedtime and warming time.  Ghost, since she has two, has started perching at night with a chick perching on either side, poking out from a wing.  They seem smug about it.  Velvet ,with three, has to stay on the floor to hug them at night.

The chicks are at that miniature stage where they have all their feathers and all the chicken moves, but they are still just tiny little handfuls.  They have frowns all the time.  Dinosaur growth spurt dead ahead.  All the chicks seem to be baby Cheeks, although that was not planned this time.   There’s a Ghost sighting out the front window!

Velvet must be very nearby.  There she is!

Pincushion chickens

Hurricane’s over.  The three are back to trying to sleep in the tree.  SO stubborn.

It’s cooling off at nights, so it’s good time for the hens to grow their feathers back.  It’s such a relief when they start to refeather, because they go naked for what seems like terribly long, and it looks so uncomfortable I worry, and then one day, they come out in little spikes all over that unroll into feathers.

There was a Silkie, I forget her name- she was a ragged half naked mess from the time she got here.  She never had her feathers sorted out.   Over a year.   She raised two sets of babies and I thought that’s just who she was, that she was going to look like a worn-out dish rag forever.  Then one day, poof, feathers inbound!  And now I can’t pick her out of the lineup.  She looks completely normal.

There’s a Brahma re-feathering, Velvet is no longer naked, phew!, and this is Sidewinder.  She hasn’t been the cringy slinker that she was in the winter- her behaviour has been more confident.  Maybe it was the friendship.  She’s a Grandma now – the Sidekick grew up to be Ghost.  She’s so old and has been defeathered since last summer!  I always find reasons to imagine they won’t ever grow back, then they look renewed out of nowhere.Perchick remains looking painfully cold and naked.  It’s almost sweater weather if she doesn’t pincushion out soon.

Velvet and Ghost

The co-mamas.

These are the first hens to successfully hatch babies in the large coop.  Right through the heat wave, they sat on eggs, and I brought them water.  They would even switch eggs, so it makes sense that they’re one family now.  They only spent two days in the chickeries, maybe three, before release and integration.  Nosey visitorThey still had unhatched eggs, one each (they did not hatch late, they gave up on them), so the hatched chicks had a nice slow transition).Ghost scooted her egg out of the box to belly up to the food.  When they’re ready to get up off the nest, they’re ready though, and Velvet tore her whole chickery apart, every inch of the ground scratched up, letting me know she was ready.Velvet has three and Ghost two, but all five look like Cheeks’ bio-offspring, an accident since I gave them a mix of eggs.  Five of nine total hatched.   I can’t tell the five apart, but the hens can- look out!  They all roll together most of the time, though, so the chicks intermingle constantly.

It’s a really cute thing they’ve got.  Mom friends- Our kids are the same age!  They’re black and white, and they were both total loners prior to brooding.  I feared for Velvet’s life because she would just leave.    The little orange feet!  I can see where you are!They started visiting the house!  That was cool.  A noisy cheeping procession.  I heard them coming.  This is where we scrounge for snacks, and under the house it’s dusty and cool… There they are, traveling on together.  They like the bee area.   Perching practice on the jungle gym (laundry rack).  It doesn’t sway like a branch.  They’re up to the second rail now.

We have different cultural ideas about how we should look after a bath.

We had rain!  (Blessed rain!)  Dust baths are closed, mud baths now available.  I was pretty surprised to find this little enthusiast digging in. Really digging in.

Naturally, onlookers.Because when you’ve planned to go to the spa, you go to the spa.What?  Some people pay good money for this.The Colonel included for dirtiness comparison.  Yes, the Colonel is still the big boss, my v first rooster from my v first collection of chickens.  What?  I just got out of the bath!Helloooo, boys!

Next door, the retirees were getting into it too, with much more reserve.  It’s nice to see the Brahmas doing something fun.  They’re always so serious and often seem to be just existing.  This got some more facial expressions out of them though.  They’re like cats in catnip.  They get the zoned face, and they scratch, like, Can’t help. Myself.  Must scratch in this. And then they roll around, and do some What are you looking at?

Yay for rain.  A rain storm, even.  The chicks even got put in the greenhouse with their moms- huge day!  Huge!  I got my rain barrels almost all filled again too, in one day’s rain – that’s a relief!