Tag Archives: chicks

I’m back!

I was sneaky; I was posting chicken pictures while I was away. But I’m back home and everyone is fine, including the 10 little unseasonal chicks. They’re bigger than they were.

Ursa has four.

Also, I’ve started producing new content at my new location: https://steempeak.com/@selka. You might recognize some of the initial stories:)

So far the platform is so easy to use that it’s like finally getting a drink when you’re thirsty. I’m so ready to say goodbye to WordPress. When I make the switch, the web link happyharvest.ca will just point over there, instead of here, so that little will be affected. I’ll have to confirm that email subscribers aren’t affected either.

For a bit I’ll post on both, until it’s time to switch. I’ll be keeping you posted (harhar).

I will keep this site alive always, so that all of the stuff stays here, but I’m going to stop paying for it, so ads will come back on, etc.

Chicken in a sink!

We’re goin’ to China, kids

It’s the chicks’ debut. Everyone comes to look.

Ursa’s first day in the chickery: she celebrated her first day out of the broody box as the hens always do, with a vigorous dirt bath.

This is how you dig a hole!

I placed her in the former location of the peat bag (the over flow spot), for premium dirt bathing.

The kids start to come around, Hey, I’m kinda cold, can I get under you?

Nope!

Stand back, kids, mama’s getting her bath on!

She’s like a round fur tornado, spraying everything down with dirt. Evidently, it feels incredible.

How about now?!
Maybe…..
No, not done yet!

Chickyback ride!

There are now an astonishing TEN unseasonal chicks. Ursa has four, and the other hen has six. Only the two of them stuck out broodiness to the end; all the others gave up (thankfully!)

I’m coming up there!

Ursa has graduated to spending days in a chickery, so the other mama is in the bigger corner coop suite, for a few days, as her chicks are more freshly hatched. A couple are brand new out of the egg.

I think this is Chocolate, but I’ll have to check photos to be sure:)

Only the white ones show up in the low light coop. There are four others under her- brown, black and grey.

Chicks are adorable; it’s hard not to get attached, as they have a hard time not falling over backwards taking a drink, and pile up in the food dish and then wonder what to do.

It’s possible, but to be realistic – it’s unlikely for them all to survive, born in the winter like this.

You never know.

unseasonal chicks

Who has chicks in winter?  Ursa Minor does.

Ursa’s got four little chicks (living).  Two were already dead.  The future is not bright for chicks hatched at the beginning of winter.  But I’ll do my best to help her.

One piece of cardboard and she’s got a student apartment now.  That’ll be enough space for a few days, as they’ll spend most of their time under her.

I moved her back from the kitchen so the chicks would tumble out so I could get some pictures.

Turns out the chicks were super into some more food.

The other four crazy broody hens (down from six crazies – turns out it IS contagious) are busy playing egg burgle bingo, trying to steal eggs from each other.  We’ll see if any of them also successfully hatch.

First snow!

First snow in October!  Real snow too, big swirling flakes that are sticking around for a little while.  The Caped Crusader doesn’t wait for me to distribute the food.These are the four middle chicks, having a snow day in the greenhouse.  Snow is pretty much rain, only quiet. The co-mamas and the  7 Silkies.  Adorable.  They’re so tiny.  I’m in dread of stepping on one, since they’re so small and brown and hard to see.   Luckily Marshmallow is fierce.  She runs off any of the other chicks and hens, so I know these little ones are getting enough to eat.

There’s a cuckoo.  Apples’ chick is large than the few days lead she has on the others, and is probably a Silkie cross.

Co-mamas

Brown Bonnet and Marsha (Marshmallow) are cute.  They hang out together, their chicks spilling over into each other.Brown Bonnet is very maternal and relaxed, and all seven of the little Silkie chicks will sometimes be with her. Marsha’s a bit nervous.  At night sometimes they share a box, and they readily share patches of food without competition.  Our kids are the same age (and size), we should be friends. This little one is already developing an extravagant hairdo.

Mini release

She’s got four!  Two and two.  They’re still ridiculously small, but in spite of being the size of golf balls, they are developmentally old enough to be bold adventurers.  Time to prop open the chickeries so they could creep out and join the chicken greenhouse society.  Here they come!Mom immediately dove into a sprawly dirt bath.   Nothing celebrates freedom like throwing dirt over your head.  Brown Bonnet was a bit more furtive.  The chicks readily popped out, But Brown Bonnet wanted to mostly hide behind a board.  

Every morning I have an exploding box of chickens

Every morning I have an exploding box of chickens.  Most have them have pushed out of the cardboard boxes they so tranquilly spent the night in, and are jumping, and pooping, and scrapping all over top of the boxes, frantic to get out.We’re all cooped up!The broody kennels too (now night occupancy for the greenhouse chickens).

They all come busting out, scratching and fluttering, and then vanish, absorbed into the jungle.  They love a good hay bale.

Brown Bonnet has three little chicks, including the chick that Apples hatched.  This was a terrible hatch for her.  Two of her own, successful, and three that failed to make it out of the egg, even with my help.  She was having one hatch every day, and after her first two she was up and off of the eggs except at night (Three’s enough), so the late chicks really struggled (and died).  They’re so tiny.   They look like they could fit comfortably in a ping pong ball, because they could.  Just got out of smaller quarters. One white, one spider brown, and one white with rust accents (Apples’)