Tag Archives: grass

Garlic and grass

Planted the garlic today.  On paper that’s half a month late, but by the weather, it’s just the right time.  The beds covered with hay look exactly the same after planting as before.  So many worms under the mulch!

I started some wheatgrass for the guineas.  I couldn’t remember if wheatgrass required soil or not, and I’m still not sure, so I’ll start trying it soil free.  I will also find out soon how many days it takes to become edible, and cycle trays through the windowsills.  Now we can spend all winter with the windowsills filled with start trays too.

Tomorrow is scheduled to be yard day for the chickens, so that should be fun and exciting.  I have to drape the greenhouse adjunct garden with bird net to thwart the sky predators and the guineas from escaping, and cut doors, and then they will have an outside yard they can come and go from.  I expect enthusiasm.

What do I do when I haven’t taken any pictures all day?

Take pictures in the fading light at guinea hour.There’s the guineas grazing in colour-coded groups.There’s the chicks that slipped out today, quite proud of themselves.  Nosey on the left.  They’re pretty good about following the guineas back in, when they call it a night. The little barred rock again.  I’m with you, right?  I’m the right colour! Oooh, can I come out?! The small chickens are so cute. They’re cute right up until they’re suddenly big burly roosters swaggering around.  They spend a great deal of their juvenile lives independent of their mothers.  Months.  They have so much growing yet to do when they strike off on their own, but their sibling bonds (the chicks they shared a nest with) seem to stay really important until full adulthood.

Today was a big sun bathing day, warm in the greenhouse, chicken legs stuck out everywhere.  It’s very quiet when it’s warm.  The birds are all flopped out, dozing.  Too sedate to squabble.   Tomorrow, rain.

I made fudge, which is awesome because it involves vats of melted chocolate:Also worked, as usual, and felled some more of the ugly buckthorn forest.  Is the glass half full or empty?  I can look around after two tanks of gas burned and see little difference, or I can go  Yeah, two more tanks of gas … spent cutting down an invasive so regeneratively powerful I might start calling them Triffids.  I have to do that in the morning in order to feel any accomplishment about it.  When the snow comes, I think that’s when the amount of land I’ve cleared of the beastly GLB this fall, a fraction of the infection,  will actually look like something.  Here’s hoping.

Let them eat grass!

I’ve made the observation that guineas “like” to eat grass the way addicts “like” heroin. They seem desperate for it.  They’ll crowd up and rip grass so you can hear the grass getting mowed.

Just a hunch.  Guineas need grass in their diet more than the average bird.So post-bobcat, I’ve been letting the guineas outside for a half hour before bed, to get their grass fix.Really? Then I stand over them, supervising, but they’re so into the grass they barely notice me.  Happy little grass-eating satisfaction noises.

Now I’m going to have to grow grass for them in the winter.Yes, a couple roosters also wander out, but it’s so close to chicken bedtime that they don’t get too far.  This little chick always comes out.

Lush

There’s that green.  The world is overwatered right now and the grass is growing with all its might.  Expect to see it in the eggs soon – the chickens are free range again (fair weather only).  

HW comes home and says ” Where’d all these starts come from!?”  “You grew these?”  Yep, they’re the same ones as were there yesterday, and the day before…  “They’re so big!”  Yes, they are.  And so green.  Ready to go outside.

I was shuttling tomatoes and set a box down for one second to empty the wheelbarrow….oh…oh!  Here they come, creeping.  Is the hand faster than the beak?  No, she got a leaftip!

The green mist

I´ve been waiting for this.  Our wonderful neighbour came back and gave the field another pass with the tiller, and brought his hand seeder too (which I loved!).

Now the green mist has appeared on the ground.  In this case the early spears are oats, which were supposed to be planted sparsely, for a shade cover.

If you look directly at it, there´s hardly any green to be seen. 

The before picture.

I knew, any day, there would be a dust of green across it, and indeed, it came nearly overnight.

I was casting seed by hand too, and it appears I have a heavy one.  One might notice in the top photo there is a distinct strip of thicker oats.  It´s almost strangely straight edged.   Oh well.