Tag Archives: paint

Camper painted

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*  highlights from hindsight, aka “Learn from our mistakes”:  Prop the roof of the camper up before you get it spray foamed- it will solidly hold the form it is in when it’s sprayed.  Also put the windows and roof vent in and mask them all off good with garbage bags, before spraying.  See this post. Take foam off in little layered chunks instead of trying to make it smooth – see near end of this post.

There’s been progress on the camper front.  After a long hiatus, we’ve got it painted inside (mostly).

IMGP4682This stage was delayed because in order to paint inside, we really needed to be able to pull everything out of the inside, and that meant having a roof to move everything into.

But at long last we did it.  When we pulled all our stuff out we got to fix a few things, add some screws where strain had been showing, replace the floor underneath the bed, run new wires to the brakes, and a few other adjustments and improvements.

You can see how happy he is about it
You can see how happy he is about it

The big job was definitely carving the spray foam insulation.  As we were advised, we got some bread knives from goodwill and went at it by hand.  Whoowee, what a job.  H.W. did the majority of the labour while I was fidgeting with other things, but what a task.  Early on we surrendered the idea of making it look good, or smooth.  That was out of the question.

And how happy I am
And how happy I am

Even flexible knives are hard to work when held in a curve, and that gets old over time.  Then the blades lift little crumbs and chunks out of the foam.

It didn’t look very good, and it was tough sawing away, really tough to work with arms overhead for so long.  We decided we’d be satisfied with more consistent headroom and taking down the major protrusions.

On the bright side, it improved greatly when it was painted.

IMGP4691The carving was long and hard and exhausting.   All the crumbs of foam clung to us all over with static electricity and trailed us around like PigPen.  It was a huge mess.  We ruled out the sander early – it made an even finer, messier dust and didn’t have great results.  The grit immediately filled with foam and was useless.

IMGP4688So it looked bad, and we let go of that and  just beavered away at it until we couldn’t take it any more.  H.W.’s thumb sustained some damage from flexing the knife all the time and had to have  a day off.  I emptied a couple cans of expanding foam in little voids, hidden cutouts, and burying the tail light wires into the wall.  It acts like glue, really sealing the framing into the body of the camper.  I also sealed the edge of the arborite sheet we laid down under the bed as floor with foam.

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We generated four bags of garbage and spend ages vacuuming every inch of surface

Next we painted, and things went from bad to worse.  Rolling was out of the equation with the irregular surface so we dabbed and dabbed and dabbed with brushes.  The foam and all the pores and gaps in it sucked it right up, so that we ran out of paint early and just barely were able to cover the visible areas, leaving orange in all the cupboard spaces.  IMGP4709That was a really depressing stage.  It’s one thing when you see results for hard work, and another when it takes longer and is harder than you expect and it doesn’t look good.

The rough foam prevented painting (cutting) a tight line against the wood trim around the windows, or the cupboards, or countertop, or anywhere.  Ugh.

DAP to the rescue!  I decided latex caulking is pretty much paint, only thicker.  I caulked around all the windows, really pressing the tip into the foam and smearing it out into the painted area.  IMGP4743We were using untinted paint and brilliant white caulk; this may not fly so well with coloured paint.  The expanding foam out of the can, much less dense than the spray foam, accepts the caulking much better; it kind of permeates and impregnates the foam, hardening stiff.  And once there’s a bead around the edge, it’s much easier to paint up to.  So caulking saved the day, making clean transitions between foam and Corex and shelves, etc.

What we didn’t expect was how the look of the painted foam would change.  The parts that really looked good after painting were where I had taken slices out of the foam in layers, sometimes it made a herringbone pattern.  IMGP4786This was largely my work, as I’d gotten lazy and was just trying to take down the material and not make it fancy, hacking chunks out.  Painted, that looks kind of cool, almost like rock.  I suggest tackling foam in this way from the beginning.  There’s going to be texture one way or another.

Slicing layer after layer is an easier motion to make, too.  Slice in and snap off the chunk of foam.

*Oh! Crucial advice- we were using dressmaker's pins at all times, constantly checking our depth to make sure we never got too thin on the insulation.  We kept it a consistent incn and a quarter to inch and a half deep.
*Oh! Crucial advice- we were using dressmaker’s pins at all times, constantly checking our depth to make sure we never got too thin on the insulation. We kept it a consistent inch and a quarter to inch and a half deep.

Doesn't show up quite the same with flashAfter that, it was just reinstalling the Corex/Coroplast we’d unscrewed to paint around, putting the doors back on,and reloading all our stuff.  The whole event was about five days.

It doesn’t look bad.  It’s much brighter with all the white, the curtains look sharp, and there’s more clearance everywhere.  The painted foam is sealed, no longer crumbly.  Inside closets where the foam was cut down and not painted, it sheds crumbs at a regular rate.  Someday I’d like to seal all that in with paint too.

Foam around the base of the wall over edge of arborite

There are still touchups and more caulking to do, because we didn’t have the luxury of time to really finish the minutiae, but the big things are done, and importantly, we shouldn’t have to dismantle the camper again, or even move out of it wholesale.

It’s sort of adobe like, or like stucco.  It’s a cozy natural texture.

Closer to finished!

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Last camper post, and the full collection of posts about our fiberglass egg reno.

Voila- the Little Green Bug, the Aphid, the Ameracauna Egg…

OMG, we got it back!  So excited!  It looks so good, all shiny and new.  I love it one colour and I love the colour.  It’s bright in the sun and much darker and more olive-y in the shade.

The body shop guy was solicitous, going over and pointing out all the flaws in their paint job, especially the ones they couldn’t help.  We kept telling him, we don’t have a Mustang here, and we certainly didn’t pay for a Mustang finish. It was a fabulous job, and we got it for a budget price, no question.

Another thing about painting fiberglass- it has some weird property that it can have micro cracks that only show up when it’s painted.  They were minor, of course.  Our giant side patch turned out so well.  I was so proud.  It’s the largest smooth spot on the trailer now, and it’s so close to perfect.  At just the right angle with the right light the outline of the former holes are visible.  But who cares!

We spent the drive home thinking up names for it and also catching glimpses of it in the mirror and having a jolting moment of “What’s behind us?!”

I’m a big fan of the Aphid.  It’s exactly aphid colour.  But it’s totally an Ameracauna Egg!  It’s a fiberglass egg – a green one.  Hahaha!

Painting

After going over every inch of that camper with sandpaper and primer and filler, we knew the features of that shell like skin.  There are lots of flaws from the original molding that I’d never seen before.  After the intensive body work, though, it looked so much better to me.  Primed, as it were, to step into a new stage of life, renewed by paint.

We made one last stop on the way to dropping off the camper to see one more  rack of paint swatches.  That and we’d run out of primer.  We did our final priming and sanding touches in the parking lot of Lowe’s.

It was really tough to imagine a tiny square of colour over the whole camper, let alone how it would translate in the sunshine.  We were settled on a very tight range of tones in green, but there were still many hesitations. Was it too light?  Too pretty?  Too pastel?

The cost had made our decision to have it all one colour.  It was considerably more to have it two tone, so it was an easy choice to go one colour.  It will make it look more like a Boler.

Among the many other things I knew nothing about in the realm of automotive body work was something about paint.  Most cars are painted with a two stage process.  One stage for colour, then a clear coat.  This is more expensive (much more), and apparently it’s not the right thing to do on fiberglass.  Not everyone does the older style of single stage painting any more, where they mix the clear coat or “glossifying” agent in with the colour.  There’s more, about matching colour painted on plastic bumpers versus metal, and “side colour”, the tone of paint as seen from the side.  It’s a science.  We heard the dramatic price difference and sought out single stage please; one colour, sure.

When we brought it in we got good reviews on our bondo work and were approved to drop it off.

It was a big step, dropping the whole camper off in the back lot of the body shop and leaving it behind.  Totally different than leaving the chassis to get work done.  We’d spent so much time with it lately, and now we were just going to drive away and wait.  On the other hand, it was a relief to stop vacillating about paint colours.  We’d cast the dye.

Last look at the camper in its vintage two tone.