Tag Archives: personal growth

One week in:

Happiness Project assessment, one week in:

I found out that “write when I feel the urge” is easier than I thought it would be, judging by the complete row of checkmarks.  I only needed the validation of checkmarks by a list item to let myself seize those moments of inspiration.  That and the little warning flag I made to hang out for my husband to tell him to ignore me while I’m writing.  Which is working very well.

The only other new institution to have an unexpected 100% score is journalling.  While I write consistently overall, and sometimes I keep a journal, I never consistently keep a journal, and I would like to (I’ve begun to, as a matter of fact).  It seems the form was the key.  I got a dateless day planner with about an inch of space per day.  Thinking of it as a one sentence journal, although an inch will fit a few sentences if you write small, made it easy.  It takes about a minute to review the day.  So the secret is to make the task manageably small, which makes the bigger goal achievable.  This little journal reminds me now of the 92 year old woman who

Never was a list so serious

BluebirdTo kick off my Happiness Project, I made myself an official Happiness Project list.

Every project, before it can begin, requires a fancy supporting document, with at least a little colour, sometimes on the scale of a major arts and crafts event.  This one I wanted to do on my computer.

In a spectacular example of the wrong approach, I started the day with cookies, didn’t drink water, and spent nearly a day creating the list of my model Happiness plan.  The irony was not lost on me, as I flouted early entries ON the list, like hydrate; wrestled with text in a handwriting font when I could have written it by hand faster; and spent energy on an accessory, at best- creating a list instead of taking actions that were on the list.

I started out with a vision of digitally straight line tables and slick graphics, but never imagined it could take so long. I slaved away, using four different programs because I didn’t know how to make one do what I wanted, and got teeth-grindingly hungry and mad at the whole project.  I was too deep in it by then to give up, though.   There was probably a point of turn-around, where it would have made sense to write off the time already invested and not waste any more, but I missed it. Continue reading Never was a list so serious