Tag Archives: protecting wild birds

Window protection saves wild bird

I had a bird finally test the bird protection window screens I’m so proud of.

I happened to be inside to see a bird fly straight into the window.  I’m quite sure it was a young robin.  There are two being attended by frazzled moms right in the vicinity of the house, and one overactive and very friendly baby woodpecker that’s always on top of us – very cute.  But this wasn’t the woodpecker, it was a substantial dark bird, so I’m sure a robin.

The bird came straight at the window full tilt, and then slammed into the screen, spreadeagled like a cartoon of a bird whacking into a window (not a  funny cartoon!), then instead of errrk, cartoon squeaking down the glass…  SPROIIING!  The mesh rebounded and threw it back, the bird tumbling and recovering in the air.  I didn’t even have time for my mouth to fall open, watching the whole thing in an instant.

Awesome!  Exactly like I imagined. It didn’t even contact the glass.

HW got over the aesthetic issues and slight obstruction of the view long ago, so I’m in the clear with my no-kill windows.

wild bird protection success

I love pussy willows.  I was distraught that I cut a big patch down, not recognizing it, and heartened to see how it’s vigorously grown back elsewhere it was chopped off in the past (and I have a fair bit).  The plant is hard to recognize out of fuzzy season.Philippe Petit has a problem still.  Some days he seems fine, some days he limps. Poor guy:(The Silkies are getting out more.  As I predicted, the little silver adventurer is often first outside or out on her own.  Cutie.  And the Colonel is often leading the way out (and the flock ignores him and stays in).The hens are using the great outdoors quite well, free ranging again, but they like the familiar comfort of the greenhouse still, and settle back in inside early afternoon.

It’s time to celebrate the total success of the mesh window protection I used this winter, to protect the wild birds from window collision.  Not one casualty.  We got used to the screened view, and it was totally worth it.   I saw birds sometimes rocketing straight at the window and pull up and veer at the last moment, so clearly they could see it, and it was never tested for its possible bird rebound properties.  That I know of.

 

no-kill windows

I tried something new to protect the birds from the windows.  I used to have gift wrap ribbon dangling and fluttering – it works well, but not 100%.  One or two birds still struck the windows every year, and that’s a sickening thump I could live with never hearing again.

So I raised my game.   I stretched black nylon bird netting over our windows, on little posts to hold it away from the surface.  I think there’s enough tension on it that even if a bird flies full speed and direct into the window, its momentum will be absorbed before it hits the glass, enough to save it from injury.

More likely the birds will see it readily and the spring rebound will not be tested.

I’m waiting for the chickadees to come stand on my posts to eat their seeds.It’s not a Better Homes and Gardens look.  Not many things are around here.  HW was not impressed.  “What if I did something like that?  Stuck pieces of wood and baling twine all over the house?  I’d be in so much trouble!”  I disagree.

From the inside, it looks like security glass.  The mesh is subtle, but definitely visible.  However, if it prevents wild bird death:  totally worth it.

It’s cool that I can recognize individual birds returning to the feeder now.  The Nuthatch is back, with an offspring and I strongly suspect that it is the Nuthatchling that we met in the summer!  It took me a bit, but I remembered that last year the Nuthatch had a long and steep learning curve using the feeder.  Man, she was bad at it!  But this nuthatch came in like a pro and did some demonstrations, so definitely the same little bird. Watch and learn, youngster.